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How To Choose The Right Torch For Your Task – Gear Up With Gregg’s

How To Choose The Right Torch For Your Task – Gear Up With Gregg’s


Hi there! My name is Dale, and welcome back
to another episode of Gear up with Greggs. Today were going to be finding our fire with
Bernzomatics line of torches. But, as always, we want to focus on safety first. Okay, maybe I went a bit overboard with the
safety gear. However, there are some things you’ll want to think about before you use
a torch. And, lucky for you, theres an easy way to remember what you’ll need to do in order to have a safe experience with the Bernzomatic torches. Its the acronym FUEL: FOLLOW, USE,
EMPTY, and LIGHT. FOLLOW the product label instructions and
read any safety warnings before use. USE appropriate safety gear and clothing, including protective gloves and safety glasses. EMPTY your work area of dust, cobwebs, and any other flammable debris. And finally, LIGHT. Light your torch only in well ventilated areas and away from pilot lights, flames, sparks, or any other sources of heat. Easy, right? Lets start by talking about the Trigger Start
Torch. This torch is designed for a wide range of jobs including soldering or brazing large
diameter copper pipes, heat treating, and light welding. The large, optimized swirl
design tip ensures your flame burns hot and efficiently for maximum heat output and fast
soldering times. The automatic Start And Stop Ignition lights and extinguishes the flame
with the push of a button, while a locking button keeps the torch lit for continuous use. This torch is great for thawing pipes, loosening putty or paint, or removing rusty
nuts and bolts. You can even use it to roast a hot dog if you cant get that fire pit going! Yum! Next up is the 360 Degree Swivel Torch, which
makes tight spots a breeze! The 360 Degree vertical swivel provides greater access to small and awkward spaces, allowing you to solder, braze, and heat treat with convenience and ease. The Trigger Start Ignition makes lighting the torch quick and easy. The Maximum
Heat Swirl Flame makes for faster soldering times, and the Adjustable Flame Control Knob
provides precise flame sizing. This sturdy torch is sure to meet your needs, whether
its soldering pipes or getting that perfect finish on your handmade wooden furniture. Now for this guy. This manual torch is designed
for a variety of uses, from small diameter soldering to thawing frozen pipes. With a
half inch wide pencil flame, durable brass body, and an adjustable flame control knob,
this torch will be great for the general contractor who wants the no frills solution to get the
job done. But hold on, wheres the ignition source? Well, when I said manual, I meant
it. You’ll need one of these bad boys to get any flames flying, since the torch doesn’t
have the means of creating a spark on its own. The spark lighter is easy to use. Simply
turn the knob on the torch counter clockwise slowly. Keeping it away from your face, squeeze
the lighter to create a spark. If the torch doesn’t light immediately, turn the torch
valve clockwise and close it, waiting at least five minutes before trying again. If you’re feeling impatient, just remember, there might be a buildup of flammable gas in the air, which could mean one big fireball and a trip to the emergency room. Next is the micro flame torch, which is ideal
for precision jobs around the shop. This includes fine soldering, craft projects, and applying
Heat Shrink Tubing to wire. This torch features three interchangeable settings. A Pinpoint Flame, Hot Air Blower, and Fine Soldering. With an easy to use Trigger Start and Continuous
Run Lock, this torch is perfect for touching up those little projects around the shop. For other projects, where you might need a wide, flat flame, consider the flame spreader attachment, which can be used with all half
inch outside diameter burn tips. This can come in handy when you need to burn a large area at once or for soldering with an even distribution of heat. Or, if you’re just looking
for something to have handy around the house, consider picking up a flexible lighter. With
its wind proof flame and bendable shape, this lighter is great for both indoor and outdoor
use. For instance, it can light any barbecue with ease or light that deep set candle without
burning yourself! So, next time you’re going camping, consider taking Bernzomatic along
for the ride! Now, lets talk about the parts of a torch.
There are two main parts to any torch. The Cylinder, which holds the fuel needed to produce
the flame, and the torch head itself. The cylinder can hold any of the three major fuel
types. Propane, Max Power Propylene, or MAP Pro, and Butane. These fuel types are indicated
by the color of the cylinder. Blue for Propane, Yellow for MAP Pro, Red for Oxygen, and Green represents Butane, but as you can see, the butane cylinder looks a little different. Butane is used to refuel micro torches, soldering
irons, and other small devices. It comes in a 5.5oz cylinder, which has a universal tip
for easy filling, Butane burns at a lower temperature, 1760ºC to be exact, which allows
a more controlled application. Perfect for shrink tubing or other small soldering jobs
such as wiring. Propane, in the blue cylinder, is designed
to fuel hand torches in order to complete jobs such as pipe applications, softening
putty and adhesives, and removing rusty nuts and bolts. Out of all gases used in torches,
propane is the most common. Propane burns at 1898ºC and is used as fuel in furnaces
for heat, in cooking, and as an energy source for water heaters, laundry dryers, barbecues,
portable stoves, and motor vehicles. MAP Pro, in the yellow cylinder, is more efficient
and burns hotter than propane. This premium fuel is suited for a variety of projects including soldering or brazing large copper pipes, and heat treating. Brazing is the process of joining
two pieces of metal together to form one strong, load bearing joint, without melting the base
materials. Which is what makes it different from welding. You braze materials by melting
and flowing a filler metal into the joint, the filler metal having a lower melting point
than the adjoining metals. MAP Pro produces a flame that burns at approximately 1982ºC. Which is plenty hot enough for most brazing metals. Oxygen, in the red cylinder, combines with
other fuels and produces a high intensity flame thats perfect for light welding, cutting
thin metal, and hardening metal surfaces. Oxygen, when paired with MAP Pro is great
for those jobs that require a higher burn temperature, such as brazing. For a dual fuel
torch, the answer is the brazing torch kit which includes a burner wand, hose, oxygen
regulator, MAP Pro fuel, oxygen, spark lighter, and more. Now that we know what fuels a torch, lets
set one up. Its easy. Lets use the trigger start torch as an example. Start with attaching
the cylinder to the torch head. Simply remove the cylinder cap and screw the cylinder into
the torch head until you feel it tighten. Always make sure your torch is turned off
and that you turn the cylinder, not the torch, so that the torch is never pointed toward
your face or body. To use your torch, turn the knob counterclockwise
and press the ignition. This will create a spark that will light the gas that is flowing through the torch head. After every use, be sure to lock your ignition, turn the adjustment knob fully clockwise until it stops, and remove the cylinder from the torch. Always store
your cylinders in well ventilated areas away from living spaces and out of reach of children. If you have any other burning questions, please
don’t hesitate to call us. Or you can visit our website at greggdistributors.ca. Again,
Im Dale, and thank you for watching another episode of Gear up with Greggs. And remember,
keep it Canadian!

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